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Thread: Soy effect on thyroid and weight gain?

  
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    Soy effect on thyroid and weight gain?

    Does anyone have a good source that I can use to learn about the effects of Soy on the Thyroid? My thyroid tests are all in range but I can't help to think that over consumption of soy products has changed my metabolism. Is it possible for your tests to be in range even though you still have a thyroid issue?

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    Hello @knarlycharlie

    While I dont know much about Soy and soy products, I must say I keep reading conflicting statements everywhere. While it seems if you suffer from thyroid related issues, it's best to avoid it all together or keep it absolute minimum. On the other side, if you have a normal thyroid function, which I believe is your case, then there is no reason to avoid it.

    Having said that, have a read on this article.

    Soy is known to produce estrogenic isoflavones. Here, we briefly review the evidence for binding of isoflavones to the estrogen receptor, in vivo estrogenicity and developmental toxicity, and estrogen developmental carcinogenesis in rats. Genistein, the major soy isoflavone, also has a frank estrogenic effect in women. We then focus on evidence from animal and human studies suggesting a link between soy consumption and goiter, an activity independent of estrogenicity. Iodine deficiency greatly increases soy antithyroid effects, whereas iodine supplementation is protective.
    Thus, soy effects on the thyroid involve the critical relationship between iodine status and thyroid function
    . In rats consuming genistein-fortified diets, genistein was measured in the thyroid at levels that produced dose-dependent and significant inactivation of rat and human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in vitro. Furthermore, rat TPO activity was dose-dependently reduced by up to 80%. Although these effects are clear and reproducible, other measures of thyroid function in vivo (serum levels of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone; thyroid weight; and thyroid histopathology) were all normal. Additional factors appear necessary for soy to cause overt thyroid toxicity. These clearly include iodine deficiency but may also include additional soy components, other defects of hormone synthesis, or additional goitrogenic dietary factors. Although safety testing of natural products, including soy products, is not required, the possibility that widely consumed soy products may cause harm in the human population via either or both estrogenic and goitrogenic activities is of concern. Rigorous, high-quality experimental and human research into soy toxicity is the best way to address these concerns. Similar studies in wildlife populations are also appropriate.
    You can dowload the full article from here

    Goitrogenic and estrogenic activity of soy isoflavones.

    Source - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1241182/

    I am not sure if it's true that soy will reduce your metabolism otherwise hyper thyroid patients would have been given this advise. Do you mind me asking why would you want to over consume soy products anyway? Overconsumption of anything would have ill effect on your health.

    Best thing is to avoid it or reduce the consumption for two weeks and see if you notice any difference? Could it be something else other than thyroid if your thyroid results are normal? Perhaps calories taken are far more than calories spent, hence weight gain?


 

 

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